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beautifulsouthasianbrides:

Photos by:Bikramjit Bose

"A Bride’s Tale ;Editorial from Harper’s Bazaar Bride India"

Perfect.

(Source: harlequinnade)

japhers:

violently Filipino Cecil because yaaaaas

yung-maple:

tintomatotop:

yinx1:

teflonwonton:

yinx1:

locsgirl:

thefemalegoonie:

eriannny:

reflectionof1:

MODERNITY IN SHAPING THE STATUS OF AFRICA Both Cost 150,000 US Dollars.

gtfohhhhhhhh

Soo does a man come with the Nigerian house or nah?

Dang

Man usually comes with the house but there are some for the single lady’s.
Seriously our house in Lagos is about this big. America doesn’t know jack about “third world” countries.

errrr… yah. but then you wake up and you’re in Africa.. its not just about the square footage or amenities of a home but you must consider the neighborhood.. do i feel safe with who is living next door? is there clean, running water? is there wildlife to be concerned with? what are the roads like? and seriously most importantly DO I HAVE HIGH SPEED INTERNET. I AM NOT DOWNGRADING TO 56K. NEVER AGAIN

Okay, so I see I need to give a geography lesson, let’s see if I can say this humanly

1. The OP said Nigeria NOT “Africa”
2. “Consider the neighborhood”? What kind of IS is that?! People are PEOPLE wherever you go. You have your rich you have your poor. You have your smarts, and you have people like you that spout IS. 
3. Seriously, roads?
 
THIS IS LAGOS, NIGERIA HIGHWAYS…Looks a lot like LA…HMMM.

4. Wildlife? We have wildlife in the states; bears, deer, my mother saw a coyote outside her office window and she works 20 minutes away from downtown. What are you suggesting?
5. Lastly this is the stupidest thing. Internet. Is it not the Nigerians coning your gullible American asses out of your life savings. So much you it has cause alarm, and has government protocol so your stupid grandmother does send her savings thinking she can get rich quick. I think Nigeria has Internet and HIGH SPEED under control
I suggest you read, adsorb, learn and apply. Before spouting off about “Africa” again. =_=


TELL ‘EM 

BOOM

yung-maple:

tintomatotop:

yinx1:

teflonwonton:

yinx1:

locsgirl:

thefemalegoonie:

eriannny:

reflectionof1:

MODERNITY IN SHAPING THE STATUS OF AFRICA
Both Cost 150,000 US Dollars.

gtfohhhhhhhh

Soo does a man come with the Nigerian house or nah?

Dang

Man usually comes with the house but there are some for the single lady’s.

Seriously our house in Lagos is about this big. America doesn’t know jack about “third world” countries.

errrr… yah. but then you wake up and you’re in Africa.. its not just about the square footage or amenities of a home but you must consider the neighborhood.. do i feel safe with who is living next door? is there clean, running water? is there wildlife to be concerned with? what are the roads like? and seriously most importantly DO I HAVE HIGH SPEED INTERNET. I AM NOT DOWNGRADING TO 56K. NEVER AGAIN

Okay, so I see I need to give a geography lesson, let’s see if I can say this humanly

1. The OP said Nigeria NOT “Africa”

2. “Consider the neighborhood”? What kind of IS is that?! People are PEOPLE wherever you go. You have your rich you have your poor. You have your smarts, and you have people like you that spout IS. 

3. Seriously, roads?

 

THIS IS LAGOS, NIGERIA HIGHWAYS…Looks a lot like LA…HMMM.

4. Wildlife? We have wildlife in the states; bears, deer, my mother saw a coyote outside her office window and she works 20 minutes away from downtown. What are you suggesting?

5. Lastly this is the stupidest thing. Internet. Is it not the Nigerians coning your gullible American asses out of your life savings. So much you it has cause alarm, and has government protocol so your stupid grandmother does send her savings thinking she can get rich quick. I think Nigeria has Internet and HIGH SPEED under control

I suggest you read, adsorb, learn and apply. Before spouting off about “Africa” again. =_=

TELL ‘EM 

BOOM

(Source: bluelightvine)

completely-dunn:

wifipassworcl:

thepottertardis:

apertures413thdoctor:

pleatedjeans:

via

Ellen what the fuck happened in 1998

ellen degeneres came out in 1997

yeah but ellen what happened in 2014

ellen page came out in 2014

completely-dunn:

wifipassworcl:

thepottertardis:

apertures413thdoctor:

pleatedjeans:

via

Ellen what the fuck happened in 1998

ellen degeneres came out in 1997

yeah but ellen what happened in 2014

ellen page came out in 2014

thisandthathistoryblog:

hjuliana:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:


A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.
If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.
Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.
Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

ALL OF THIS IS SO COOL

I found something too awesome not share with you! 
I’m completely fascinated by the history of food, could I choose a similar topic for my Third Year Dissertation? Who knows, but it is very interesting all the same!

thisandthathistoryblog:

hjuliana:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:

A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.

If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.

Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.

Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

ALL OF THIS IS SO COOL

I found something too awesome not share with you! 

I’m completely fascinated by the history of food, could I choose a similar topic for my Third Year Dissertation? Who knows, but it is very interesting all the same!

(Source: wine-loving-vagabond)

michaelblume:

intlsugarbaby:

sugar-babe-kira:

european-sugar:

prostheticknowledge:

Creepface

Online image search tool and Chrome extension that claims to locate US sex offenders in it’s database with facial recognition analysis:

This Free online safety tool uses Facial Recognition to scan photos of Potential Dates, Coaches, Teachers and more… Check them all with CreepFace instantly!

Just Right Click and Select “Scan with CreepFace” to check any online photo against 475,000 Registered Sex Offenders in the U.S.

Facial Recognition powered by FacialNetwork.com

The Creepface online search engine can be found here

REBLOOOG

reblooogggggg!!!!!

Given the number of things you can get on the registry for, this actually sounds really awful, and like it’s going to make life even worse for a bunch of decent people who’ve already got it pretty bad.

Still useful. 

pixiejess:

jackthemother:

So this happened on facebook today….

Way to go Jackie Underwood!

kamala-k:

shatterstag:

turdlewexler:

callmekitto:

fencetan:

waffilicious:

buetterfliege:

radioactivemongoose:

anne hathaway in drag
anne hathaway in drag

this is one of few things that I cannot look at without compulsively reblogging

I love this picture and I have no clue what the fuck is going on but oh my god

i don’t know what’s happening but it’s good

someday i’m gonna write a faux-historical queer drama and people will ask “what was ur inspiration” and i’ll be like that one picture of anne hathaway in drag kissing the pretty lady

For the record, this was Anne in Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night.

she played Viola. Since a lot of people are like WHERE IS THIS FROM????
You might also know its adaption with Amanda Bynes: She’s the Man.
“Viola is shipwrecked on the coast of Illyria and she comes ashore with the help of a captain. She loses contact with her twin brother, Sebastian, whom she believes to be dead. Disguising herself as a young man under the name Cesario, she enters the service of Duke Orsino through the help of the sea captain who rescues her. Orsino has convinced himself that he is in love with Olivia, whose father and brother have recently died, and refuses to see any suitor until seven years have passed, the Duke included. Orsino then uses Cesario (Viola) as an intermediary to profess his passionate love before Olivia. Olivia however, believing Viola to be a man, falls in love with Cesario (Viola), while Viola has fallen in love with the Duke.”
so pictured is Olivia, Viola, and the Duke Orsino. 

the best shakespeare play hands down
also in one of the film adaptions the duke, Orsino, kisses ‘Cesario’ while he still believes she’s a man.

Right, but what I’m hearing is that Shakespeare finally got Anne Hathaway to be in one of his plays. historical puns WHOOO

kamala-k:

shatterstag:

turdlewexler:

callmekitto:

fencetan:

waffilicious:

buetterfliege:

radioactivemongoose:

anne hathaway in drag

anne hathaway in drag

this is one of few things that I cannot look at without compulsively reblogging

I love this picture and I have no clue what the fuck is going on but oh my god

i don’t know what’s happening but it’s good

someday i’m gonna write a faux-historical queer drama and people will ask “what was ur inspiration” and i’ll be like that one picture of anne hathaway in drag kissing the pretty lady

For the record, this was Anne in Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night.

she played Viola. Since a lot of people are like WHERE IS THIS FROM????

You might also know its adaption with Amanda Bynes: She’s the Man.

Viola is shipwrecked on the coast of Illyria and she comes ashore with the help of a captain. She loses contact with her twin brother, Sebastian, whom she believes to be dead. Disguising herself as a young man under the name Cesario, she enters the service of Duke Orsino through the help of the sea captain who rescues her. Orsino has convinced himself that he is in love with Olivia, whose father and brother have recently died, and refuses to see any suitor until seven years have passed, the Duke included. Orsino then uses Cesario (Viola) as an intermediary to profess his passionate love before Olivia. Olivia however, believing Viola to be a man, falls in love with Cesario (Viola), while Viola has fallen in love with the Duke.”

so pictured is Olivia, Viola, and the Duke Orsino. 

the best shakespeare play hands down

also in one of the film adaptions the duke, Orsino, kisses ‘Cesario’ while he still believes she’s a man.

Right, but what I’m hearing is that Shakespeare finally got Anne Hathaway to be in one of his plays. historical puns WHOOO

(Source: wuthering-heights)

steampunk style lolita

*some of these are not necessarily steam punk, but can certainly be used in steampunk inspired coordinates!

(Source: daily-random-frills)